Buttermilk Falls

Ludlow, Vermont

Branch Brook, Black River

Swimming Hole
Swimming Hole
Swimming Hole
Swimming Hole
Wildlife & Watershed Protection
Wildlife & Watershed Protection
A series of waterfalls and pools, some up to 25-feet wide and deep enough for submersion.
Dogs allowed on leash
Dogs allowed on leash
Hiking
Hiking
Danger, drowning
Danger, risk of drowning
Buttermilk Falls Ludlow, Vermont Branch Brook, Black River

Buttermilk Falls

Generations of Vermonters have loved Buttermilk Falls. When private developers threatened to put up “no trespassing” signs here decades ago, Vermont River Conservancy stepped in to make sure people would always have access to this special place. Today, the site is owned by Vermont Department of Forests, Parks, & Recreation, and Vermont River Conservancy holds an easement.

When visiting, a short 0.5-mile trail leads to the falls. More than just a place to splash, Buttermilk Falls’ upper and lower falls each feature pools deep enough for complete submersion. The falls change with the seasons, making it a great place to visit again and again. Water plunges over ledges when water is high, then transforms into a quaint twist of water in midsummer.

The upper falls is split into two 12-15 foot drops, and its water streams into a large swimming pool below, where visitors will find clear water and a pebble-covered bottom. The lower falls flows into a deep 25-foot-wide pool of clear, olive-green water. In spring or after a rain, the water plunges over the ledges. Later in the season, these torrents convert to quaint twists of water wrapping beautiful around and over rocks.

Conservation Details

  • River: Branch Brook, Black River
  • Acreage: 7.00
  • River frontage (ft): 2,500

Funding Partners

This project made possible thanks to the support and partnership of:

  • Black River Action Team

Directions

From the center of Ludlow, VT, take Route 100 north. Turn left on Rt. 103. Buttermilk Falls Road is approximately 1.5 miles further on the right. Turn here and proceed to end. The falls and Branch Brook are along the abandoned stretch of old Route 103.

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